The neuropsychologist working in addiction: What to know? Ten questions and answers

The neuropsychologist working in addiction: What to know? Ten questions and answers

Antonio Verdejo García, PhD1,2

ABSTRACT

Substance addiction is characterized by problems in controlling drug use, signif- icant interference with other meaningful activities, and persistent use despite growing negative consequences. Psychoactive drugs have a strong impact on brain function and related consequences on thinking, emotion and behavior, and hence social and occupational functioning. Thus, this is an area of interest for neuropsychologists in terms of characterizing deficits, functional impact, and strategies for recovery or compensation. The aim of this review is to go over some of the fundamental questions and challenges that neuropsychologists working in this field often face. I approach this goal in the form of ten key questions and their corresponding answers, which are based on existing research and personal experience in the field. Questions and answers cover some of the fundamental aspects of drug-related neuropharmacological and behavioral effects, the neuropsychological assessment in the context of addiction, and the approaches to retraining and rehabilitation of deficits. I conclude by presenting a vision of the future for neuropsychological practice in the context of the addiction clinic.

1 Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, Monash University
2 Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre

Corresponding author:
Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences 18 Innovation Walk
Clayton VIC, 3800 Melbourne, Australia

Tienes que iniciar sesión o registrarte para poder descargar el pdf del artículo.